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Cooking Light on Soup Night February 17, 2010

Posted by Toy Lady in Cooking, Fattiness, Food, soupe du semaine.
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Well, look at that – I made a rhyme!  Well, that was fun, wasn’t it?

You may (or may not) remember how we were going to start actually cooking stuff from the (several) food magazines to which we subscribe, à la Zach and Clay.

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Of course, it didn’t help that we just added Food & Wine and Cooking Light to the collection.

In my defense, my niece was selling “stuff” for a school fundraiser, and my options were magazine subscriptions or, I don’t know, $27 wrapping paper?

Hello Cooking Light!

Then, I scored my $1 leeks at the public market (I should have bought all they had – the next week, they were $3!), and right about then, I stumbled upon the Jamie Oliver Leek and Potato Soup recipe in January’s Cooking Light, and, well, like that.

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And, since someone else has already gone to the trouble of posting that recipe on Recipezaar, I won’t bother.  Just go on over there and print it out for yourself.

So we took our nice, clean leeks (2 of ’em), and I sliced them a little thinner than ½ inch.  I wasn’t sure if Peeps was going to want to ultimately puree the soup or not, so I figured smaller was easier to puree, and it was also, well, smaller if we left it chunky.

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I also enlisted my husband to peel potatoes – the recipe called for Yukon golds, but I’d picked up some red-skinned gold potatoes at the market, and, well, once they’re peeled, who’d know the difference, right?

My potato experience has essentially been limited to “baking” and “waxy” – you start flinging specific varieties at me, and my head might explode.  It’s a potato.  Sheesh.

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Now that the potato question is settled, I chopped the rest of the veggies – about a pound of onions, a cup each of celery and carrots, and a couple of cloves of garlic.

Did I ever mention that “Santa” brought me a new santuko knife for Christmas?  I (heart) my santuko – and it’s nice that Peeps gets a chance to use his birthday knives once in a while.

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So anyway, we tossed all the veggies in the Dutch oven to cook in just a bit of olive oil, partially covered, until they were nice and soft – about 20 minutes.

While the veggies were cooking, we heated 3 pints of chicken stock (which would be the same as the 6 cups called for in the recipe) in the microwave.

Do you know that a quart jar won’t fit in the microwave?  That’s kind of inconvenient, wouldn’t you say?

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Once the vegetables have softened, add the heated stock and the cubed potatoes, and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and cook, covered, until the potatoes are done, about 10 minutes, then salt and pepper to taste.

We did decide to leave the soup “rustic” – the veggies were chopped fairly small, so it made a nice chunky soup.

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We reheated this soup later in the week – we always like to let soup sit in the fridge for a couple of days to marry the flavors – and this was no exception.  It was full of great, homey flavors – potatoes and leeks and homemade chicken stock.  I always know when a soup is a hit by how many days I have it for lunch – if no one else will eat it, I usually end up stuck with it, but if it’s good, I might get one lunch, then it’s gone by the time I get home from work the next day.

This one was gone before I got to it for lunch, so . . . I guess it’s a keeper, huh?

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Comments

1. judy - February 17, 2010

Please send my quart by Federal Express. I will be watching. As an aside. the Fed Ex man on my route looks delicious too.

jiudy

Jude! You’ve gone and shocked Peeps! 😯

I’ll, uh, keep you and the FedEx guy in mind, though, next time I make a delightful soup. . . 😉


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